Submissions to the Horizon Post Office IT Inquiry

This is the intended text for oral submission to the Horizon Post Office IT Inquiry made by Richard Moorhead, yesterday based on the work of the team researching the Post Office Scandal at Exeter’s Evidence-Based Justice Lab , with Dr. Rebecca Helm (Exeter) and Dr. Karen Nokes (UCL).[1] I have three points, some are of … Continue reading Submissions to the Horizon Post Office IT Inquiry

Why the Williams’ Inquiry must not narrow its Horizons

Our latest submissions (Working Paper 4) to the Horizon Inquiry on Horizon is up on the Lab site. It responds to the Williams' Inquiry raising 4 issues about the scope of its work which suggests that someone (the Chairman? Post Office??) thinks Second Sight's Investigations; legal work on civil and criminal cases brought by Post … Continue reading Why the Williams’ Inquiry must not narrow its Horizons

LegalGeek: changed, yes; a terrible beauty, no (Guest Post)

The words of W.B. Yeats in his often quoted poem Easter 1916 could be applied in part – the first part – to Legal Geek which I attended yesterday in London: “All changed. Changed utterly. A terrible beauty is born”. The word terrible referred to the terror experienced by the repressed, as Yeats saw it. Covid 19 … Continue reading LegalGeek: changed, yes; a terrible beauty, no (Guest Post)

Mutually Assured Irresponsibility: An Example from the Post Office

A striking feature of many corporate or other scandals is how organisations and their lawyers construct a system of mutually assured irresponsibility. Some of this is done artfully, some without even thinking about it. The problem often, subtly or unsubtly, comes down to this: the client says they did what they did because the lawyer … Continue reading Mutually Assured Irresponsibility: An Example from the Post Office