Author Archives: Richard Moorhead

About Richard Moorhead

Director of the Centre for Ethics and Law and Professor of Law and Professional Ethics at the Faculty of Laws, University College London with an interest in teaching and research on the legal ethics, the professions, legal aid, access to justice and the courts.

Tiger, Plant, Freshfields and the Short Sellers

Charles Plant, outgoing Chair of the SRA who has led the SRA through one of the more interesting phases in its relatively young life, had some interesting thoughts in a recent valedictory speech (at legal futures).  In particular, flat-earther comments aside, … Continue reading

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Guest Post: Future Bar Training? A Soft and Uncertain Launch

The Bar Standards Board has today “launched” what it calls an “ambitious new programme to reshape legal education and training” and has asked the Bar for its help.[1] However, it’s not entirely clear what has been launched, nor is any … Continue reading

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Excalibur sends chill wind… (again)

The latest instalment in the Excalibur case is interesting for many reasons. One is Lord Justice Clarke’s claim that making litigation funders pay costs on an indemnity basis when costs are awarded against the party they are funding on an … Continue reading

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CEPEJ Data: Common Law Countries, Average but not with Legal Aid?

I have had a chance to have a bit of a closer look at the CEPEJ report.  It compares public spending on various parts of the justice system in a great deal of detail.  Inevitably in seeking to make comparisons, … Continue reading

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Justice, justice on the wall, who is the biggest spender of all?

There’s a new comparison of spending on the justice system out by the European Commission for the Efficiency of Justice (CEPEJ) .  I have only had a chance to have a quick look but it supports the view that the government’s claims that … Continue reading

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We abolished the Cab Rank Rule by Mistake

Back in March I wrote this about the Cab Rank Rule and its exceptions suggesting the exceptions were what the Cab Rank Rule was increasingly about.  The rule was disappearing.  I discussed several rather large exceptions to the rule – legal … Continue reading

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QASA: time for some embarrassment

The Master of the Rolls has given judgment in the QASA appeal where the barristers choosing to judicially review the LSB’s approval of the BSB’s scheme for QASA lost comprehensively.  The broad brush of reasoning seems to me to be: … Continue reading

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